Making sense of it all

It’s the economy, stupid!

Bill Clinton’s campaign for the US Presidency centred on the economy and it’s impact on people’s daily lives. Tony Blair’s followed a similar arc. Barrack Obama’s legacy lies in the boom that his successor, Trump, is claiming the credit for. The bust we experienced in 20018 to date (2018) owes much to the policies of the 1980s and the dividends it delivered to the wealthy.

How many of us understand this and appreciate what the consequences might be?

Today, more than ever, we need to educate people on how the economy works and why decisions made in seemingly remote centres of power affect our daily lives and are at the root of the way we view the world.

Economic inequality has led us to Brexit and Trump.

Steve Bannon, one of the architects of Trump’s rise to power, is now working with various politicians in Britain and Europe. Racist and misogynistic language, which influences policy formulation, is mainstream. ‘Fake news’ is on the rise as conspiracy theorists take to social media and spread misinformation. And fed into the void of economic powerlessness misinformation spirals into ungovernable actions against those with less power – women, racial or religious minorities – leaving those who profit and those who instigated the attacks with their inflammatory rhetoric blameless. 

At the root of all this lies the economy; who it enriches and who it impoverishes are at the heart of the way our world is turning.

Robert Reich’s animated video spells it out very clearly. Watch and wise up:

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FRBReich%2Fvideos%2F2024464874232765%2F&show_text=1&width=560

Jus Soli

London is a rich tapestry, of places, people, mixed birthrights, and diverse viewpoints.   It’s what I love about this city.

Jus soli (English: /ʌs ˈsl/; Latin pronunciation: [juːs ˈsɔ.liː]), meaning “right of the soil“, commonly referred to as birthright citizenship, is the right of anyone born in the territory of a state to nationality or citizenship.

Part of the ‘People of Pimlico’ project, funded by Bloomberg as part of their commitment to the Royal Court Theatre’s outreach activity, this film takes in the voices and viewpoints of members of the community living in Pimlico and mixes them with actors and performers from the Royal Court.   The results are fascinating – and at times the juxtapositions are surreal.

Food for thought.

People of Pimlico: Jus Soli